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Klondike can now breathe a little easier

Klondike can now breathe a little easier

This is a little bit of old news to our Facebook and Instagram followers, but about a week go we installed an AFE Power cold air intake.

Normally, we are not fans of CAIs, especially with the Pentastar engines. We know several people that have pretty severe oil consumption after running their JK/JKU (3.6L) in dusty environments. Sadly, many ultimately needed a new engine to resolve and the fault was put on the CAI they ran. Even the Mopar branded intakes did not shield the warranty denials. Compound this with the fact that we tend to believe all those power gains felt are a placebo effect from spending money and not wanting to admit it was a waste of it. After all, if it were that easy why wouldn’t the manufacturer do it?

As stubborn and opinionated as we are, we still listen and keep open minds. So, when so many people over at The Jeep Cherokee Club mentioned not only felt performance gains, but also increases in fuel economy (something we have struggled with), we thought it made sense to give it a try.

To make a long story short, Jay and I can’t believe the difference the intake has made. We have noticed fairly significant throttle response improvements and while it’s a little too early to tell for sure, we think our average MPG has jumped by about 2! These aren’t the only gains though, the little 3.2L sounds pretty amazing! We had no idea she had such a pretty voice 😛

The changes are literally so drastic, it got me wondering why? After all, even AFE only advertises a 9HP/10lb-ft increase. It’s hard to imagine this change on top of the 3.2L’s 271HP/239lb-ft stock specification would change the vehicle’s performance so drastically.

The only real answer I have is where the power is added…. See the dyno chart below.

The 3.2L Pentastar has a VERY steep HP and torque ramp in the 2,000 – 2,400 RPM range. After this, the torque is very flat and the HP follows a nice (and far shallower) ramp. The thing is, the ZF9 transmission that the KL Cherokee uses keeps the engine in this very low RPM range where even the slightest wind, hill, or load change forces a drop in gear, or even multiple gears, for the engine to find enough power to handle it.

This is just my opinion, but since the largest gains the CAI provides seems to be right in this area, it makes for a fairly drastic drivability improvement. There are small grades that Klondike used to downshift for where she now easily holds onto the current gear.

So, all-in-all, we are extremely happy with this mod and recommend it to just about any 3.2L KL owner.

In the spirit of full disclosure, AFE needs to reevaluate the hole location for the air temp sensor. Ours barely reached the hole they provide and this was after removing some tape that held it to another harness which allowed for more direct routing. Also, notice the sharp increase the AFE intake provides at ~2200 RPM… This is felt when driving. It almost feels like the engine hits a “power band” like a 2-stroke 😛 . From this point until about 2600 RPM is also where the largest sound change is, so it’s hard not to step into it a bit for the sound. In any case, it does take a little getting used to when putting around town. 🙂

 

JK/JKU Parking Brake (E-Brake) Adjustment

JK/JKU Parking Brake (E-Brake) Adjustment

If you own a JK or JKU, and especially if it happens to be a manual transmission, you know how crappy the factory parking brake is. There are a few factors to this. For one, it seems the lever and activation mechanism is prone to breaking and, even when it is working “correctly”, seems to not reset well. The other major factor is in the drum itself. While it is supposed to auto adjust (we don’t see how), we have never seen one that does so. Thus this write-up on how you can manually tweak them in and get your JK/JKU holding again.

Now, this write-up begins with the assumption that you are already fairly familiar with auto maintenance and are comfortable with safely jacking and lifting the Jeep, along with removing the wheels and calipers.

With the above said; this video should help you with everything else…

 

A few additional points you may want to focus on a bit more are pictured below.

The red circle depicts the actual wheel that spins like a nut to extend the screw and spread the shoes apart (this is the fixed side). The lever in the cab pulls on a cable that spreads the opposite side to engage the brake. When the fixed side is too loose there isn’t enough throw in the lever/cable to spread the moving side far enough to make the brakes grab.

The green arrow is the access port where you can adjust the parking brake without taking the drum/rotor off. Our issue with doing this is the missed opportunity to clean and inspect the area.

Here is how this inspection/adjustment port would work. Note: The spring not only holds the shoes in place and tight to the adjuster, but also works as a prevention method to keep the adjuster from free spinning.

 

I know this may have been the Cliffs notes version for many, so if there are any questions please post them as we are happy to help. 🙂

Getting Dirty ready for Spring!

Getting Dirty ready for Spring!

It’s been since mid November that we last made an update on Dirty. This is partly because we are nearing the end of her build (for now) but largely due to the fact we just don’t do much with her over the winter. Ohio roads normally see lots of salt and we just prefer to leave her inside when there isn’t a good reason to have her out. While we went into winter with some thoughts of doing some snow wheeling, mother nature had other plans and provided a pretty mild winter.

Fast forward… We now find ourselves looking at the beginnings of spring and need to get her ready for what is shaping up to be a very busy ’17.

When we last left off we were trying to decide if we should get bead-lock wheels to go along with our recent purchase of Pitbull Rockers. Sadly, this decision was made for us. Due to some issues with Pitbull crediting our initial payment and then wanting repayment via other means, we decided to cancel our order on the new rubber. This leaves us running another season on what we have. I think this will work out for the better in the long run anyway. We are pretty sure that we will be swapping in some 1-tons late this year or early next which means a new bolt pattern anyway.

So, with us running the rubber we have, we really only needed to handle a few odds-and-ends to get Dirty ready… All of which I knocked out this weekend.

The cross member and exhaust loop skid had been tweaked and was rattling on the exhaust. In fear of never getting them back on, I opted to cut/grind the skid plate in place to gain clearance. Then, I added a gusset to replace some strength that was lost with this removal of material. (Sorry, no pics.)

One of our last times on the trail knocked the front differential and broke the RTV seal on the cover again. It wasn’t anything serious, just a drop or two every couple of weeks. Still, oil out means water in and I knew it needed resolved before we hit the trail again. Instead of going the RTV route, we opted to use a Lubelocker reusable gasket. I must say… I have long thought these things are a waste of money, but now don’t see myself ever reinstalling a cover without one. In fact, had we not had one I wouldn’t even have been able to make this repair this weekend. It was near freezing outside and in the low 40s in the shop. This is too low for RTV to set-up correctly.

There it is… Not much after nearly a 5-month hiatus, but it’s all we have.

 

…next up, convert the 4-pin trailer wiring to 7-pin to work with Ehu.

 

KL Cherokee 3.2L Pentastar Engine Oil Change

KL Cherokee 3.2L Pentastar Engine Oil Change

No matter how you use your vehicle, routine maintenance is a necessity. Changing the engine oil is one of the higher frequency ones. Sure, you could visit the local quick change place and have them do it for you, but really, it’s a pretty easy job that can be done with a few simple hand tools and time.

Hopefully this “How-to” write-up will inspire you to give it a go.

 

Before you begin:

As I mentioned you will need some basic hand tools. Rummage through your tool box and make sure you have the following:

  • Oil Catch Pan (One with a pour spout is a plus)
  • Funnel
  • 13mm socket and ratchet (a 13mm wrench can also be used)
  • 24mm socket and ratchet w/6” extension (I use a t-handle rather than the ratchet)
  • Small pick (a small flat head screwdriver can also be used)
  • Paper towels or rags
  • Drive up ramps or jack and jack stands (optional)

Beyond tools, you will also need to make a trip to the local auto parts store for the following:

  • 6 quarts of 5W-20 ¹
  • Oil Filter ²

 

With the above items handy, let’s get going!

 

Begin by pulling the nose of your KL up onto some ramps to gain some extra clearance for the work that will be done underneath. Alternately, you could jack up the front and support it with Jack stands. In truth, this is optional but makes the job a bit easier in the long run.

Ensure the vehicle is in Park and the emergency brake is set. Then, open the hood and remove the oil fill cap and set it aside. It can be found on the front passenger side of the engine. This is to allow air flow so the old oil will drain better.

 

 

Next, grab the oil catch pan along with the 13mm socket and ratchet. Place the catch pan under the drain plug (which can be found on the passenger side of the engine).  Shift it toward the back of the Jeep as the oil will drain in an arc, especially in the beginning.

I like to loosen the plug with the socket and ratchet but remove it completely by hand as it allows for better control. This helps prevent accidentally dropping the plug into the pan with the old oil.

 

As mentioned, the oil will come out in an arc so account for this when placing the catch pan.

 

You will have undoubtedly gotten some oil on your hands and the plug… While wiping up, inspect the drain plug seal for any cuts or damage that could lead to leaks.

 

Once the oil flow has drained to a drip, reinstall the drain plug but there is no need to crank on it. While I never torque it, the specification is only 25 ft-lbs.

Give the pan and plug a final wipe down. You’re all done with the underside work!

 

The 3.2L Pentastar that is found in V6 Cherokees share a similar oil filter design to its 3.6L big brother. The oil filter housing is part of the engine and only the filter media itself is replaced.

Access to the filter housing is gained via an access hole on the passenger side of the engine cover. Turn the cover counter-clockwise about 30 degrees before lifting the cover.

 

Once the cover is out of the way you will see the oil filter housing and cap below.

 

Loosen and remove the oil filter cap using a 24mm socket and extension. Note:  the cap is spring loaded, so it will feel a little odd when being unscrewed.

Once completely loose, remove the cap and filter which will be attached to it. There will be some oil dripping from the filter so have some paper towels and/or rags handy.

 

The filter is held in place by a small plastic detent. To remove it from the cap, just give it a little tug. Your new filter should have come with a new cap seal (o-ring). Be sure to swap the o-ring out on the cap before snapping the new filter onto it.

 

Once you have replaced the oil filter cap seal and snapped the new filter into place, reinstall the assembly back in/on the engine. I was unable to find a torque spec for the filter cap, but it will be clear when it is fully screwed in. There is no need to over-tighten it.

Replace the inspection cover.

You are now ready to install the new oil.

We typically purchase a 5 quart jug of oil and one stand-alone quart to save some money. The larger jug can be tricky to start pouring even with a large funnel. A trick I learned is to cut a small opening from the foil seal along with a port for air rather than just remove the foil all together.

 

Once all 6 quarts of oil are poured in you can reinstall the oil fill cap and you are done!

 

“Wait” you say? “I forgot to check the level!” In my opinion there really is no need to check the oil unless you can’t count to 6 and think you may have missed a quart or you spilled a bunch. But since I know there are many that will disagree, here you go:

Start the engine and let it run for at least two minutes. Then turn it off (Oil level can only be checked with the engine OFF). Wait another two minutes. Remove the oil dip-stick (yellow ring at the very front of the engine). Wipe all oil off of the stick with a rag and reinstall it.

Remove the dip stick again and look at the oil level which will be found at the very bottom.

Sorry for the bad picture, but you can still see the markings on the dip stick above. The markings indicate the 6th quart. The oil should be touching or at the upper marks when the engine oil is full. If the oil is at the lower marks, the engine is one quart low.

Note: Ours looks just a touch low because I didn’t wait the two minutes to ensure all the oil had drained back into the pan prior to taking this picture.

 

Wrapping up:

Another reason I like to purchase oil in one large 5 quart jug and then add a single quart is also for the clean-up. My catch pan has a pour spout and I turn around and pour the used oil I just took out of the engine, right back into the now empty new oil jugs. This makes for easy transport to the oil recycler.

There are also some catch pans that have lids or can transport the oil to the recycler without this step.

Recycling used motor oil works differently depending on where you live, but it’s an important step. Here in Ohio, any place that sells motor oil, must also accept it for recycling.

Just a few more comments:

¹ Jeep recommends oil that meets or exceeds MS-6395. This is an old and outdated specification and it can be tricky to find oil with it. The type of oil we are using in this write up has NOT been tested for MS-6395. It does however meet or exceed the required specifications.  If you are concerned about warranty ramifications, Mobil Super Synthetic does have MS-6395 approval but was not available for us locally. It also is vastly more expensive.

 

² We use either Wix or Mobil-1 filters based on availability. The filter part number we used here is a Wix WL10010.

PUG Update (Engine not the Dog …or is it?)

PUG Update (Engine not the Dog …or is it?)

David Zats with Allpar released an “update” (if you want to call it that) on the almost forgotten upgraded Pentastar V6s. If you read that sarcastically, that is good because the update is that there isn’t one beyond “it’s still coming”.

That’s right… no dates, no information on what vehicle will get it, nada!

There is some chatter about competing with other V6s backed by multi-speed transmissions. To this I would say, work on housekeeping of what you have before developing something new. Our Cherokee has Jeep’s first “9” speed transmission. The 9 is in quotes because we have to be going north of 75 miles-per-hour and on stone flat land to sneak in a few moments of the 8th gear. The slightest upgrade and it is immediately dropped for 7th and sometimes shoots straight to 6th. Personally, I think it’s nothing more than marketing as a 9th gear seems impossible. The result is worse fuel economy than a Ford that has a larger engine, less speeds, and weighs far more….

Still (and to relax from my negative attitude a bit) who isn’t excited about the idea of more power?


It’s now literally been years since we first talked about PUG, the Pentastar engine UpGrade. It’s still coming, even after an initial set of improvements to Chrysler’s sole V6 — which is also, heavily modified, used by Maserati.

Pentastar V6

The Pentastar is competitive as is, with up to 305 horsepower and 268 pound-feet of torque coupled with good economy, but there are still improvements to make, including adding direct injection. The company apparently also has plans to use a double-roller cam, better cam phasing, and forced induction.

Sources within Auburn Hills have told us that the Saltillo plant will be dedicated to PUG production, while Trenton and/or Mack Avenue will make the “legacy” Pentastar until they switch over as well.

We don’t know which car or truck will be first to get the upgraded V6, but we have heard that the next Ram 1500, coded DT,  is due for a twin-turbo V6, which will do battle with Ford’s turbocharged sixes.  Truck powertrains are increasingly competitive, with Ram’s eight-speeds being challenged now by nine and ten speed Ford and Chevy transmissions, and the VM diesel finally seeing domestic competition.

Source

JCR Offroad JK Inner Knuckle (“C”) Gusset Review

JCR Offroad JK Inner Knuckle (“C”) Gusset Review

With every Jeep generation release there has been improvements when compared to it’s predecessor. Unfortunately, sometimes these improvements create weaknesses in other areas. This is exactly the case with the JK’s inner knuckle or “C”. The JK Inner knuckle is larger than previous Wrangler generations which allows for larger u-joints. The larger u-joints are great, but it seems opening this knuckle up to make room for them increased the leverage just enough that the “Cs” themself are now a weakness and are prone to bending.

To compound the issue, JKs are able to fit pretty large tires with very little modification. Trimming fenders and widening the stance is about all that is needed to clear 35s. The added tire mass and lower wheel backspacing (stance) only makes this already venerable area more prone to bending.

Once bent, which can be detected by negative camber during an alignment or often visually, there is little that can be done. Upper offset ball joints can bring the camber back into spec, but they are often weaker and more prone to wear versus a standard ball joint. Since JKs (especially ones with large tires and/or a wide stance) seem to eat ball joints as is, most are either faced with poor tire wear and handling or shopping for a new housing.

An alternate solution is prevention… A whole host of manufacturers make off-the-shelf gussets that are ready to be welded on to strengthen the Cs. We have personally installed Teraflex, EVO, Synergy, Rock Krawler (Upper only), and now JCR. They all do the job but each has their own little differences. There are essentially two types of gusset designs. Teraflex and Rock Krawler use a single piece of metal that is fairly thick to support the center-line of the knuckle (“C”). EVO, Synergy, and JCR use a plate design that supports the sides of the knuckles. We prefer this latter design.

While similar in design, there are a few things that make the JCR Offroad gussets different. For one, the upper knuckle is supported slightly lower than with the EVO or Synergy variants. This is nice if you are trying to install these and save the ball joints but does offer slightly less support as a result.  Another difference is in the lower gussets. The JCR lower gussets are not ambidextrous. There is one that is specifically made for each side. This is nice as it allows for more welding surface on the back of the axle, but could be an issue for those running some coil-over or lower shock relocation brackets.

While somewhat trivial, JCR also takes the time to weld the seam on the lower gussets. It’s not that big of a deal to do with the EVO or Synergy ones, but it’s nice to have this done out of the box.

One thing I didn’t care for with the JCR gussets was their fit. There were larger gaps in multiple places where a fair amount of filling had to be done. While this is also common with the EVO and Synergy installs I’ve done, it was much more pronounced with these. This is best seen post install by the gap at the bend, near the top of the upper gusset. This is a normal spot I leave open, but usually this is only a 1/4″ or so. These were closer to a 1/2″.

If you have installed (or inspected) other similarly designed gussets, you will likely notice how much further down these sit on the upper “C” near the ball joint.

We were also replacing the ball joints while installing these gussets and the biggest issue I came across was when reinstalling the knuckle. It is pretty common for the wheel-speed sensor bracket to rotate while installing the castle nut. For the driver’s side the direction turned the bracket toward the gusset and actually caused a pretty bad interference, so much so it bent the bracket when turning the knuckle to lock.

To correct this I had to get a helper to hold the bracket in place with a small pry bar (rotated the opposite way) while I tightened the castle nut. Again, no biggie, but if you are working solo or miss this it could lead to a damaged sensor cable. This has not been an issue with any of the EVO or Synergy gussets we have installed.

In summary:

There is nothing wrong with these gussets, they are cheap insurance for a known weakness on the JK housings. Having installed other variants, these are not my preference, but I wouldn’t hesitate to install these again should a friend be in need and this is what they had.

 


 

Other notes on Installing Inner Knuckle “C” Gussets:

  • Not all welders (the people or machines) are the same. I have seen a ton of people get these installed at a muffler shops. Most muffler shops have small welders that are designed to weld fairly thin metal. The result can be poor penetration and a weld that is literally just sitting on top or the metal making the gussets look cool, but be totally useless. If you can’t weld yourself look for a shop that does fabrication work. They will be better prepared for this type of job.
  • While the install looks really simple and quick, the preparation is a bear. Welding quality is as much about the preparation as the welding itself. The paint/rust is tough to clean and lots of consumables and time go into it. I used a small die grinder and used a course wire brush, two 2″ paint removal disks, and a 2″ sanding disk. They are not cheap…. Keep this in mind when shopping for someone to install them for you.
  • Be prepared to install ball joints as part of the install or shortly thereafter, especially if you still have the stock ones. A great deal of heat is put into the knuckle around the ball joints and it damages the them. While we have successfully installed them and not damaged the stock joints, it greatly increases the time of install and usually means another person needs to be present. The second person is used to cool the series of small welds (~1/2 to 3/4″) with a wet rag immediately after completed. Most shops are not interested in adding the labor and/or time.
Looking for more power? 345 & 392 Hemi Crate Engines are available from Mopar!

Looking for more power? 345 & 392 Hemi Crate Engines are available from Mopar!

Let’s face it… most, while we love our Jeeps, it sure isn’t because of what’s under the hood… Unless of course you have already swapped out the engine 😛

Luckily for all of us still singing the high RPM song on hills have some off the shelf options from Mopar. Just in time for SEMA and showcased in an awesome concept, Mopar released several crate engines..

 


Mopar launched several create Hemi engines on November 1, 2016, to make it easier to plug factory-backed engines into iconic Mopars. The 345 and 392 Crate Engines (5.7 and 6.4 liters) can be paired with cars and trucks up to model-year 1975 — and are available for ordering today, through dealers or the Mopar site.

Pietro Gorlier, Mopar’s chief, wrote, “The engine kits include the hardware to plant a 5.7-liter or 6.4-liter HEMI engine under the hood with the factory-backed confidence that comes when using Mopar parts. They also offer optional front-end accessory kits like power steering or even exhaust manifolds to make installation easier.”

That allows owners to inject modern Hemi power and efficiency into muscle-car era cars and trucks such as the Dodge Charger and Challenger, Plymouth ‘Cuda and Road Runner, Duster and Dart, and D-series trucks.

The engines include a power distribution center, a powertrain control module (PCM), engine and chassis wiring harnesses, accelerator pedal, oxygen sensors, ground jumper, charge air temperature sensor, and installation information.

The unlocked factory PCM has a custom calibration; the Mopar 345 Crate Hemi Engine Kit bumps horsepower to 383 and torque to 425 lb.ft. for the 5.7-liter (well above production stock), while the 392 Crate Hemi Engine Kit keeps the 6.4 at 485 horses and 472 lb.ft. of torque. The engines are designed for manual transmissions; automatic transmissions, such as the Torqueflite 727 and 904, while not optimal, can also be adapted.

 

Mopar has put together accessory hardware kits including power steering, air conditioning, and a rear sump oil pan.

Both the 345 and 392 engines list at $1,795, not including the engines; they can be used with a 2014 or newer Hemi engines, or purchased with new V8s. The Mopar Crate HEMI Engine Kits feature a Mopar two-year/unlimited mileage warranty.

 

Two Mopar-customized vehicles created for the 2016 SEMA Show feature new Mopar Crate HEMI Engine Kits underhood: the Dodge Shakedown Challenger and Jeep® CJ66 (note: both pages have been updated.)

Mark Worman, of the Graveyard Carz TV show, used a kit to build a 392 Hemi into his personal 1971 Plymouth ‘Cuda, combining it with a Tremec T56 Magnum transmission. A pure, ground-up restoration, aside from the powertrain and a tweaked graphic, it uses over a hundred Mopar parts.

Other project cars at SEMA include a 1975 Dodge Dart injected with a 345 Hemi, and a 392-powered 1950 Dodge pickup.

Part numbers and November 2016 pricing

  • 345 Crate Engine Kit (PN 77072455AC): $1,795 with parts listed above
  • 392 Crate Engine Kit (PN 77072454AC): $1,795
  • 5.7-liter Gen III Hemi Engine (PN 68303088AA): Requires 345 Crate Kit, $6,070
  • 6.4-liter Gen III HEMI Engine (PN 68303090AA): Requires 392 Crate Kit, $9,335
  • Car FEAD Basics Kit (PN 77072445): Alternator, belt, pulleys, bolt MSRP $625

shakedown engine

  • Car Power Steering Kit (PN 77072448): Power steering pump, belt, bolts MSRP $255
  • Car AC Expansion Kit (PN 77072446): AC compressor, belt, bolts MSRP $350
  • Rear Sump Oil Pan Kit (PN 77072450): Oil pan, pick up tube, gasket, bolts MSRP $179
  • 45° Oil Filter Adapter (PN 77072447): Filter adapter, oil filter, bolts, seal MSRP $89
  • Jeep SRT Exhaust Manifolds (PN 77072462): Manifolds, gaskets, bolts MSRP $349

Source


I think this is pretty awesome, but what are your thoughts?

ARB failure testing

ARB failure testing

I thought this was a cool video to share. We run an ARB along with 35 spline axle shafts in the rear of Dirty. We made this change when we needed to replace the factory locker and have been very happy with the upgrade.

Yukon now has a line of air lockers that I believe are essentially the old ARB design. After watching this video you might get an indication of why they should not be compared. ARB continues to test and look for improvements. (Good for them) :mrgreen:

 

2007-2011 (3.8L) JK/JKU Oil Consumption FIX!

2007-2011 (3.8L) JK/JKU Oil Consumption FIX!

There is no doubt that the 3.8L V6 engine that is found in early JKs and JKUs provided barely sufficient power for the minivans it was originally intended for. Still, when you think about all the Jeeps that are ragged on pretty hard and revved to the limiter on the trail, the little engines do seem to be holding up fairly well.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not a total fan of the engine. In fact, I find it down right sad that some issues that plagued the Trenton, Michigan made engine from its release in the early 90s was never addressed over its 20 year run.

One of these issues has been oil consumption. It seems that whether the engine was in a 1991 New Yorker or 2011 Jeep Wrangler, oil consumption has been a hit-and-miss issue. Some seem to never have an issue while others state down-right horrific oil use from right off the show room floor.

Our 2011 JK (Lil Punkin’) now has just over 30k miles on it. We were not the original owner but we purchased the Jeep with ~18k miles. We changed the oil when we originally purchased the Jeep and then again at 20k miles to get it on our more normal 5k mile rotation. (It’s just easier for us to keep track of maintenance across our vehicles when they are all on the 2500/5000 mile schedule.)

For approximately the first 10k miles, the oil consumption was what I consider acceptable. The Jeep needed about a ½ quart at 2500 miles (halfway to the next oil change). Then, at ~28k miles Mrs.SSS checked the oil and it was a full quart low. While this seemed odd, she brushed it off assuming she had gotten distracted and/or lazy in the poor winter weather and had gone too long without checking it.

The following morning, I walked Mrs. SSS out to the Jeep (as I regularly do) and we put the needed quart in and life went on. Fast forward: Two gas fill-ups later, she finds the Jeep is a quart low again! That evening, we chat about it and convince ourselves that this is an anomaly. The following morning, I put another quart in the Jeep and send her off….. I think you see where this is going…. All of the sudden, Lil Punkin’ has gone from consuming approximately 1 quart over 5k miles to 1 quart in not even 500 miles!

Our first thoughts were to try to find a leak. Surely all of this oil couldn’t be being burnt. One would think we would smell that much oil being combusted or, at the least, see a small puff of blue smoke. Well, after rather extensive checking by both of us (including in the coolant). There was no oil in places it shouldn’t be. The only place it could be going is out the tailpipe.

With this being the case, our focus turned to “What changed?” The only real thing we could put our finger on was the oil brand. Since our purchase of the Jeep, we had been using 5W-20 Mobil-1 (Gold Bottle) oil. However, Pennzoil gave all the volunteers for Bantam Jeep Festival a case of oil last summer and, when we did the last change, we used it over our normal oil. It was still the 5W-20 that the manual calls for and it was free…. We figured “Why not”.

Believing that this switch would not be the cause of such a drastic change we then focused on what could it be? Since the engine has so few miles, we side-lined many of the typical concerns related to engine wear or damage. To be completely honest, we started to hone in on the PCV valve as a possible culprit more based on opportunity and ease of testing and replacement than anything else.

The main purpose of the PCV (positive crankcase ventilation) valve is to recirculate blow-by gases back from the crankcase area through the engine to consume unburned hydrocarbons. Blow-by is a mixture of air, gasoline and combustion gases forced past the rings on the combustion stroke. The PCV system usually has a tube leading from the crankcase to the carburetor or intake manifold. Vacuum within the engine intake manifold pulls blow-by gases out of the crankcase into the combustion chamber along with the regular intake of air and fuel.

As the PCV valve ages several things may happen. Crud and sludge can cause it to stick in the open position. This will produce a vacuum leak and it can cause the engine to lean out. In modern engines this could be detected by the O2 sensor(s) and adjusted for by adding more fuel. This would cause increased fuel consumption. Since the PCV valve is supposed to restrict flow during certain vacuum conditions, a stuck open valve that is flowing too much could also suck up oil and cause consumption. As much as one would hope that this would be detected and prompt a DTC (Diagnostic Trouble Code), it often doesn’t.

There are a few ways to test a PCV valve but to be completely honest, most are not fool proof. Many people will tell you to take it out, shake it and, if it rattles, it’s good. I will tell you I have had valves rattle that were in fact bad. The reality is they are pretty darn cheap. If you question one, just replace it… If you place any value on your time and frustration, it is well worth it.

So, with that said, I purchased a new PCV valve from O’Reilly Auto Parts for $9.99. Part number PCV555 and it is made by BWD Engine Management Technology right here in the USA! ….and got to work on the replacement.

CLICK HERE FOR THE REPLACEMENT WRITE-UP

During the replacement, I did find what I considered to be excessive oil in the tube which is a sign of a PCV valve that is flowing too much.

The other potential culprit to our new oil consumption was the recent change in oil. While we had always run 5W-20, we didn’t notice the consumption issue until we changed brands. While researching the oils a bit, I came across a fair amount of complaints by others that claimed Chrysler messed up when they switched to 5W-20. Many stated their oil consumption was improved by simply jumping to 5W-30 over 5W-20.

My problem with doing this is the oil weight directly relates to its viscosity. Oil viscosity should be selected based on a few different things, but the most important being the machining tolerances and desired flotation of the metal on metal surfaces in the engine. I had always assumed that the tolerances were tightened and less flotation was needed when the oil weight was reduced. This assumption was wrong! After a bit of digging, I found crank journal to crank specifications to be the exact same throughout the engine’s run. So, why did Chrysler change it? I really don’t know… some claim it was for increased MPG, while others say it was only because they wanted to standardize on one oil weight. The bottom-line is research revealed some merit to the 5W-30 being more appropriate and we decided to make the change in addition to returning to the Mobil-1 that we prefer. The oil was changed at the same time the new PCV valve was installed.

So, with the oil changed to Mobil-1 (Gold Bottle) and a new PCV valve, we started her up and went for a quick test run. Mrs. SSS was busy with other website stuff so it was just our youngest son (Kegan) and I making the run. I noticed immediately that the engine was running smoother but thought this could’ve been my optimism and the placebo effect at work. But then at about 5 miles in Kegan says…. “Seems like the engine is running smoother, dad.” I chuckled and agreed with him. It turns out I wasn’t dreaming it and the change was significant enough that a 14 year-old noticed it.

We didn’t want to be too quick to make judgement but we watched the oil level like hawks over the next several hundred miles, 1200 to be exact. ….and drum-role please…… I am very happy to report that we have had next to zero oil consumption or loss. That’s right… We went from losing a quart of oil every ~500 miles to next to zero in ~1200 miles with nothing more than a PCV valve swap and oil change.

Now, I know this will not be a fix for everyone, but it is certainly worth a try before you trade in your beloved Jeep. If nothing else, hopefully you enjoyed this very long read.

I will update if anything changes, but for now…. We are calling our JK oil usage issue SOLVED!

JK/JKU Diagnostic Codes 2007 – 2017

JK/JKU Diagnostic Codes 2007 – 2017

The following contains the Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTC) that can be reported by the JK/JKU Onboard Diagnostic Computer. Refer to the simple Ignition Key Procedure below to read the codes from the dashboard. If you have a tuner or programmer it likely can be used as well.

  1. Turn the key to the ignition ON position but do not start the engine.
  2. Rapidly cycle the key OFF and ON three times ending with the key in the ON position. (Never starting the engine)
  3. All of the dash lights will briefly illuminate, Then six dashes will appear in the odometer area.
  4. The six dashes will be replaced by any and all DTC codes. (You may need to do this a few times to capture them all if there are multiple codes.)
  5. When the last code or if there are none, “-done-” will be displayed in the odometer area.
  6. Turn the key off when complete

DTC codes are five characters long with the first, a letter denoting the area of failure:
B – Body
C – Chassis
P – Power Train
U – Network

The second character either 0 or 1
0 – SAE standard code
1 – Manufacture code

The third character:
1 – Fuel/Air Metering
2 – Fuel/Air Metering (Injector Circuit)
3 – Injection Systems or Misfire
4 – Aux Emissions Control
5 – Vehicle Speed & Idle Control
6 – Computer Output Circuit
7 – Transmission
8 – Transmission

Characters four and five indicate specific fault


Body

B1402 FRONT LEFT AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT HIGH
B1403 FRONT LEFT AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT OPEN
B1405 FRONT RIGHT AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT LOW
B1406 FRONT RIGHT AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT HIGH
B1407 FRONT RIGHT AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT OPEN
B1409 REAR LEFT AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT LOW
B140A REAR LEFT AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT HIGH
B140B REAR LEFT AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT OPEN
B140D REAR RIGHT AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT LOW
B140E REAR RIGHT AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT HIGH
B140F REAR RIGHT AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT OPEN
B1420 AUDIO CASSETTE ERROR/INOPERABLE CASSETTE
B1421 AUDIO CD READ ERROR/INOPERABLE DISC
B1422 AUDIO DVD READ ERROR/INOPERABLE DISC
B1423 VES DVD READ ERROR/INOPERABLE DISC
B1424 IMPROPER DVD-WRONG REGION
B1429 RADIO DISPLAY HIGH TEMPERATURE
B142A RADIO UNIT HIGH TEMPERATURE
B142C VES VIDEO SCREEN DISCONNECTED
B142D AUDIO ANTENNA NOT CONNECTED
B142E GPS ANTENNA NOT CONNECTED
B142F SATELLITE RADIO ANTENNA NOT CONNECTED
B1430 SATELLITE RADIO ANTENNA INTERNAL PERFORMANCE
B1460 CHANNEL 1 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT PERFORMANCE
B1461 CHANNEL 1 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT LOW
B1462 CHANNEL 1 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT HIGH
B1463 CHANNEL 1 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT OPEN
B1464 CHANNEL 1 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT SHORTED TOGETHER
B1465 CHANNEL 2 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT PERFORMANCE
B1466 CHANNEL 2 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT LOW
B1467 CHANNEL 2 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT HIGH
B1468 CHANNEL 2 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT OPEN
B1469 CHANNEL 2 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT SHORTED TOGETHER
B146A CHANNEL 3 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT PERFORMANCE
B146B CHANNEL 3 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT LOW
B146C CHANNEL 3 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT HIGH
B146D CHANNEL 3 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT OPEN
B146E CHANNEL 3 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT SHORTED TOGETHER
B146F CHANNEL 4 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT PERFORMANCE
B1470 CHANNEL 4 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT LOW
B1471 CHANNEL 4 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT HIGH
B1472 CHANNEL 4 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT OPEN
B1473 CHANNEL 4 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT SHORTED TOGETHER
B1474 CHANNEL 5 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT PERFORMANCE
B1475 CHANNEL 5 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT LOW
B1476 CHANNEL 5 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT HIGH
B1477 CHANNEL 5 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT OPEN
B1478 CHANNEL 5 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT SHORTED TOGETHER
B1479 CHANNEL 6 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT PERFORMANCE
B147A CHANNEL 6 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT LOW
B147B CHANNEL 6 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT HIGH
B147C CHANNEL 6 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT OPEN
B147D CHANNEL 6 AUDIO SPEAKER OUTPUT CIRCUIT SHORTED TOGETHER
B1613 PANEL ILLUMINATION CONTROL CIRCUIT LOW
B1615 PANEL ILLUMINATION CONTROL CIRCUIT OPEN
B161A COURTESY/DOME LAMP CONTROL CIRCUIT
B161E READING LAMP CONTROL CIRCUIT
B162B LEFT LOW BEAM CONTROL CIRCUIT LOW
B162C LT LOW BEAM CONTROL CKT HI
B162F RIGHT LOW BEAM CONTROL CIRCUIT LOW
B1630 RIGHT LOW BEAM CONTROL CIRCUIT HIGH
B1633 LEFT HI BEAM CONTROL CIRCUIT LOW
B1634 LEFT HI BEAM CONTROL CIRCUIT HIGH
B1637 RIGHT HI BEAM CONTROL CIRCUIT LOW
B1638 RIGHT HI BEAM CONTROL CIRCUIT HIGH
B163B FRONT LEFT TURN CONTROL CIRCUIT LOW
B163C FRONT LEFT TURN CONTROL CIRCUIT HIGH
B163F FRONT RIGHT TURN CONTROL CIRCUIT LOW
B1640 FRONT RIGHT TURN CONTROL CIRCUIT HIGH
B1643 REAR LEFT TURN CONTROL CIRCUIT LOW
B1644 REAR LEFT TURN CONTROL CIRCUIT HIGH
B1644 RIGHT STOP LAMP CONTROL CIRCUIT HIGH
B1647 REAR RIGHT TURN CONTROL CIRCUIT LOW
B1648 REAR RIGHT TURN CONTROL CIRCUIT HIGH
B1663 REAR FOG LAMP CONTROL CIRCUIT LOW
B1664 REAR FOG LAMP CONTROL CIRCUIT HIGH
B166B LEFT TRAILER TOW LAMP CONTROL CIRCUIT LOW
B166C LEFT TRAILER TOW LAMP CONTROL CIRCUIT HIGH
B166F RIGHT TRAILER TOW LAMP CONTROL CIRCUIT LOW
B1670 RIGHT TRAILER TOW LAMP CONTROL CIRCUIT HIGH
B16B1 LEFT STOP LAMP CONTROL CIRCUIT HIGH
B16F8 FRONT LEFT FOG LAMP CONTROL CIRCUIT LOW
B16F9 FRONT LEFT FOG LAMP CONTROL CIRCUIT HIGH
B16FC FRONT RIGHT FOG LAMP CONTROL CIRCUIT LOW
B16FD FRONT RIGHT FOG LAMP CONTROL CIRCUIT HIGH
B17B8 LEFT STOP LAMP CONTROL CIRCUIT OVERCURRENT
B17B9 RIGHT STOP LAMP CONTROL CIRCUIT OVERCURRENT
B17BA HEADLAMP LEVELING MOTOR CONTROL CIRCUIT OVERCURRENT
B17BF LEFT SIDEMARKER LAMP CONTROL CIRCUIT OVERCURRENT
B17C4 RIGHT SIDEMARKER LAMP CONTROL CIRCUIT OVERCURRENT
B1801 DRIVER DOOR LOCK/UNLOCK SWITCH CIRCUIT LOW (CLUSTER)
B1806 PASSENGER DOOR LOCK/UNLOCK SWITCH CIRCUIT LOW (TIPM)
B1934 DRIVER DOOR LOCK/UNLOCK SWITCH CIRCUIT STUCK (CLUSTER)
B1935 PASSENGER DOOR LOCK/UNLOCK SWITCH CIRCUIT STUCK (TIPM)
B1A08 RKE FOB 1 PERFORMANCE
B1A09 RKE FOB 2 PERFORMANCE
B1A0A RKE FOB 3 PERFORMANCE
B1A0B RKE FOB 4 PERFORMANCE
B1A0C RKE FOB 5 PERFORMANCE
B1A0D RKE FOB 6 PERFORMANCE
B1A0E RKE FOB 7 PERFORMANCE
B1A0F RKE FOB 8 PERFORMANCE
B1A10 RKE FOB 1 BATTERY LOW
B1A11 RKE FOB 2 BATTERY LOW
B1A12 RKE FOB 3 BATTERY LOW
B1A13 RKE FOB 4 BATTERY LOW
B1A14 RKE FOB 5 BATTERY LOW
B1A15 RKE FOB 6 BATTERY LOW
B1A16 RKE FOB 7 BATTERY LOW
B1A17 RKE FOB 8 BATTERY LOW
B1A20 PRE-ARM TIMEOUT
B1A23 RKE RECEIVER PERFORMANCE
B1A24 KEY NOT PROGRAMMED
B1A25 INVALID KEY
B1A26 MAXIMUM NUMBER OF KEYS PROGRAMMED
B1A27 SKREEM PROGRAMMING PERFORMANCE
B1A28 ECM MISMATCH WITH SKIM
B1A29 SKIM BASESTATION MISMATCH
B1A3C INTERNAL SIREN BATTERY
B1A3D SIREN BATTERY / LOSS OF POWER SUPPLY
B1A3E SIREN/ITM MISMATCH
B1A3F ITM ARMING SEQUENCE PERFORMANCE
B1A48 INTRUSION SENSOR 1 INTERNAL
B1A5F INTRUSION SENSOR 2 INTERNAL
B1A6D INTRUSION SENSOR 3 INTERNAL
B1B00 DRIVER AIRBAG SQUIB 1 CIRCUIT LOW
B1B01 DRIVER AIRBAG SQUIB 1 CIRCUIT HIGH
B1B02 DRIVER AIRBAG SQUIB 1 CIRCUIT OPEN
B1B03 DRIVER AIRBAG SQUIB 1 CIRCUIT SHORTED TOGETHER
B1B04 DRIVER AIRBAG SQUIB 2 CIRCUIT LOW
B1B05 DRIVER AIRBAG SQUIB 2 CIRCUIT HIGH
B1B06 DRIVER AIRBAG SQUIB 2 CIRCUIT OPEN
B1B07 DRIVER AIRBAG SQUIB 2 CIRCUIT SHORTED TOGETHER
B1B08 PASSENGER AIRBAG SQUIB 1 CIRCUIT LOW
B1B09 PASSENGER AIRBAG SQUIB 1 CIRCUIT HIGH
B1B0A PASSENGER AIRBAG SQUIB 1 CIRCUIT OPEN
B1B0B PASSENGER AIRBAG SQUIB 1 CIRCUIT SHORTED TOGETHER
B1B0C PASSENGER AIRBAG SQUIB 2 CIRCUIT LOW
B1B0D PASSENGER AIRBAG SQUIB 2 CIRCUIT HIGH
B1B0E PASSENGER AIRBAG SQUIB 2 CIRCUIT OPEN
B1B0F PASSENGER AIRBAG SQUIB 2 CIRCUITS SHORTED TOGETHER
B1B54 1ST ROW PASSENGER SEAT BELT SENSOR CIRCUIT LOW
B1B55 1 ST ROW PASSENGER SEAT BELT SENSOR CIRCUIT HIGH
B1B56 1 ST ROW PASSENGER SEAT BELT SENSOR CIRCUIT OPEN
B1B70 UP-FRONT LEFT SATELLITE ACCELERATION SENSOR INTERNAL
B1B71 UP-FRONT RIGHT SATELLITE ACCELERATION SENSOR INTERNAL
B1B72 LEFT SIDE SATELLITE ACCELERATION SENSOR 1 INTERNAL
B1B75 RIGHT SIDE SATELLITE ACCELERATION SENSOR 1 INTERNAL
B1B78 PASSENGER SEAT WEIGHT SENSOR 3 (LEFT FRONT PERFORMANCE)
B1B79 PASSENGER SEAT WEIGHT SENSOR 3 (LEFT FRONT INPUT CIRCUIT LOW)
B1B7A PASSENGER SEAT WEIGHT SENSOR 3 (LEFT FRONT INPUT CIRCUIT HIGH)
B1B7D PASSENGER SEAT WEIGHT SENSOR 2 (RIGHT FRONT PERFORMANCE)
B1B7E PASSENGER SEAT WEIGHT SENSOR 2 (RIGHT FRONT INPUT CIRCUIT LOW)
B1B7F PASSENGER SEAT WEIGHT SENSOR 2 (RIGHT FRONT INPUT CIRCUIT HIGH)
B1B82 PASSENGER SEAT WEIGHT SENSOR 4 (LEFT REAR PERFORMANCE)
B1B83 PASSENGER SEAT WEIGHT SENSOR 4 (LEFT REAR INPUT CIRCUIT LOW)
B1B84 PASSENGER SEAT WEIGHT SENSOR 4 (LEFT REAR INPUT CIRCUIT HIGH)
B1B87 PASSENGER SEAT WEIGHT SENSOR 1 (RIGHT REAR PERFORMANCE)
B1B88 PASSENGER SEAT WEIGHT SENSOR 1 (RIGHT REAR INPUT CIRCUIT LOW)
B1B89 PASSENGER SEAT WEIGHT SENSOR 1 (RIGHT REAR INPUT CIRCUIT HIGH)
B1B8D DRIVER SEAT TRACK POSITION SENSOR CIRCUIT LOW
B1B8E DRIVER SEAT TRACK POSITION SENSOR CIRCUIT HIGH
B1B8F DRIVER SEAT TRACK POSITION SENSOR CIRCUIT OPEN
B1B93 PASSENGER SEAT TRACK POSITION SENSOR CIRCUIT LOW
B1B94 PASSENGER SEAT TRACK POSITION SENSOR CIRCUIT HIGH
B1B95 PASSENGER SEAT TRACK POSITION SENSOR CIRCUIT OPEN
B1BA5 AIRBAG SQUIB CONFIGURATION MISMATCH
B1BA6 OCCUPANT CLASSIFICATION UNDETERMINED
B1BA7 OCCUPANT CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM VERIFICATION REQUIRED
B1BA8 OCM SYSTEM OUT OF CALIBRATION/NOT CALIBRATED
B1BAA OCCUPANT CLASSIFICATION MODULE CONFIGURATION MISMATCH
B1BBA PASSENGER SEAT WEIGHT SENSOR SUPPLY CIRCUIT
B1BBB PASSENGER SEAT WEIGHT SENSOR INPUTS SHORTED TOGETHER
B1BBC OCS NEGATIVE SYSTEM WEIGHT
B1BBD OCM CURRENT CONFIGURATION TABLE UNPROGRAMMED
B1BC7 DEPLOYMENT DATA RECORD FULL
B1C27 LEFT SIDE SEAT THORAX SQUIB 1 LOW
B1C28 LEFT SIDE SEAT THORAX SQUIB 1 HIGH
B1C29 LEFT SIDE SEAT THORAX SQUIB 1 OPEN
B1C2A LEFT SIDE SEAT THORAX SQUIB 1 SHORTED TOGETHER
B1C2B RIGHT SIDE SEAT THORAX SQUIB 1 LOW
B1C2C RIGHT SIDE SEAT THORAX SQUIB 1 HIGH
B1C2D RIGHT SIDE SEAT THORAX SQUIB 1 OPEN
B1C2E RIGHT SIDE SEAT THORAX SQUIB 1 SHORTED TOGETHER
B1C38 1ST ROW DRIVER RETRACTOR PRETENSIONER CIRCUIT LOW
B1C39 1ST ROW DRIVER RETRACTOR PRETENSIONER CIRCUIT HIGH
B1C3A 1ST ROW DRIVER RETRACTOR PRETENSIONER CIRCUIT OPEN
B1C3B 1ST ROW DRIVER RETRACTOR PRETENSIONER CIRCUIT SHORTED TOGETHER
B1C47 1ST ROW PASSENGER RETRACTOR PRETENSIONER CIRCUIT LOW
B1C48 1ST ROW PASSENGER RETRACTOR PRETENSIONER CIRCUIT HIGH
B1C49 1ST ROW PASSENGER RETRACTOR PRETENSIONER CIRCUIT OPEN
B1C4A 1ST ROW PASSENGER RETRACTOR PRETENSIONER CIRCUIT SHORTED TOGETHER
B2101 IGNITION RUN/START INPUT CIRCUIT LOW
B2101 IGNITION RUN/START INPUT CIRCUIT LOW
B2102 IGNITION RUN/START INPUT CIRCUIT HIGH
B2102 IGNITION RUN/START INPUT CIRCUIT HIGH
B210A SYSTEM VOLTAGE LOW (WCM)
B210B SYSTEM VOLTAGE HIGH (WCM)
B210D BATTERY VOLTAGE LOW (WCM)
B210D BATTERY VOLTAGE LOW
B210E BATTERY VOLTAGE HIGH (WCM)
B210E BATTERY VOLTAGE HIGH
B210E BATTERY VOLTAGE HIGH
B210E BATTERY VOLTAGE HIGH
B212C IGNITION RUN/START INPUT CIRCUIT OPEN
B212D IGNITION RUN ONLY INPUT CIRCUIT OPEN
B2142 IGNITION OFF DRAW (IOD) FUSE NOT PRESENT
B219A IGNITION UNLOCK RUN/START CONTROL CIRCUIT OVERCURRENT
B219F IGNITION OFF DRAW (IOD) FUSE BLOWN
B2201 CALIBRATION MISMATCH
B2204 ECU CONFIGURATION MISMATCH
B2205 ORIGINAL VIN MISSING/MISMATCH
B2205 ORIGINAL VIN MISSING/MISMATCH
B2206 CURRENT VIN MISSING/MISMATCH
B2206 CURRENT VIN MISSING / MISMATCH
B2206 CURRENT VIN MISSING / MISMATCH
B2207 OCCUPANT RESTRAINT CONTROLLER INTERNAL 1
B2208 OCCUPANT RESTRAINT CONTROLLER INTERNAL 2
B2209 OCCUPANT RESTRAINT CONTROLLER INTERNAL 3
B220A OCCUPANT RESTRAINT CONTROLLER INTERNAL 4
B220B OCCUPANT RESTRAINT CONTROLLER FIRING STORED ENERGY
B220C OCCUPANT RESTRAINT CONTROLLER ACCELEROMETER 1 INTERNAL
B220D OCCUPANT RESTRAINT CONTROLLER ACCELEROMETER 2 INTERNAL
B2212 OCCUPANT CLASSIFICATION MODULE INTERNAL
B2222 SATELLITE RADIO RECEIVER INTERNAL
B2224 SKREEM INTERNAL
B2229 SKREEM INTERNAL SKIM IMMOBILIZER
B222A VEHICLE LINE MISMATCH
B222C VEHICLE CONFIGURATION NOT PROGRAMMED
B223B VEHICLE CONFIGURATION MISMATCH
B223B VEHICLE CONFIGURATION MISMATCH
B223C INTRUSION TRANSCEIVER MODULE INTERNAL
B223D OCCUPANT CLASSIFICATION MODULE DTC PRESENT
B2254 COLUMN LOCK MODULE INTERNAL
B2304 WIPER PARK SWITCH INPUT CIRCUIT LOW
B2305 WIPER PARK SWITCH INPUT CIRCUIT HIGH
B230D REAR WIPER PARK SWITCH INPUT CIRCUIT LOW (STUCK LOW)
B230E REAR WIPER PARK SWITCH INPUT CIRCUIT HIGH (STUCK HIGH)
B2323 HEADLAMP WASHER MOTOR CONTROL CIRCUIT LOW
B2324 HEADLAMP WASHER MOTOR CONTROL CIRCUIT HIGH
B2339 HORN SWITCH STUCK


Chassis

C0077 LOW TIRE PRESSURE
C1404 TRANSFER CASE RANGE POSITION SENSOR CIRCUIT LOW (TIPM)
C1405 TRANSFER CASE RANGE POSITION SENSOR CIRCUIT HIGH (TIPM)
C1417 FRONT DIFFERENTIAL CONTROL CIRCUIT LOW
C1418 FRONT DIFFERENTIAL CONTROL CIRCUIT HIGH
C141D REAR DIFFERENTIAL CONTROL CIRCUIT LOW
C141E REAR DIFFERENTIAL CONTROL CIRCUIT HIGH
C1501 TIRE PRESSURE SENSOR 1 INTERNAL
C1502 TIRE PRESSURE SENSOR 2 INTERNAL
C1503 TIRE PRESSURE SENSOR 3 INTERNAL
C1504 TIRE PRESSURE SENSOR 4 INTERNAL
C2100 BATTERY VOLTAGE LOW
C2101 BATTERY VOLTAGE HIGH
C2207 OFF ROAD ECU INTERNAL


Power Train

P0016 Crankshaft/camshaft Timing Misalignment
P0031 O2 Sensor 1/1 Heater Circuit Low
P0032 O2 Sensor 1/1 Heater Circuit High
P0037 O2 Sensor 1/2 Heater Circuit Low
P0038 O2 Sensor 1/2 Heater Circuit High
P0051 O2 Sensor 2/1 Heater Circuit Low
P0052 O2 Sensor 2/1 Heater Circuit High
P0057 O2 Sensor 2/2 Heater Circuit Low
P0058 O2 Sensor 2/2 Heater Circuit High
P0071 Ambient Air Temperature Sensor Performance
P0072 Ambient Air Temperature Sensor Circuit Low
P0073 Ambient Air Temperature Sensor Circuit High
P0107 Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor Circuit Low
P0108 Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor Circuit High
P0111 Intake Air Temperature Sensor Rationality
P0112 Intake Air Temperature Sensor Circuit Low
P0113 Intake Air Temperature Sensor Circuit High
P0116 Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor Performance
P0117 Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor Circuit Low
P0118 Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor Circuit High
P0121 Throttle Position Sensor 1 Performance
P0122 Tps/apps Circuit Low
P0122 Throttle Position Sensor 1 Circuit Low
P0123 Tps/app Circuit High
P0123 Throttle Position Sensor 1 Circuit High
P0124 Tps/app Intermittent
P0125 Insufficient Coolant Temperature For Closed-loop Fuel Control
P0128 Thermostat Rationality
P0129 Barometric Pressure Out-of-range Low
P0131 O2 Sensor 1/1 Circuit Low
P0132 O2 Sensor 1/1 Circuit High
P0133 O2 Sensor 1/1 Slow Response
P0135 O2 Sensor 1/1 Heater Performance
P0137 O2 Sensor 1/2 Circuit Low
P0138 O2 Sensor 1/2 Circuit High
P0139 O2 Sensor 1/2 Slow Response
P013a O2 Sensor 1/2 Slow Response (Rich To Lean)
P013c O2 Sensor 2/2 Slow Response (Rich To Lean)
P0141 O2 Sensor 1/2 Heater Performance
P0151 O2 Sensor 2/1 Circuit Low
P0152 O2 Sensor 2/1 Circuit High
P0153 O2 Sensor 2/1 Slow Response
P0155 O2 Sensor 2/1 Heater Performance
P0157 O2 Sensor 2/2 Circuit Low
P0158 O2 Sensor 2/2 Circuit High
P0159 O2 Sensor 2/2 Slow Response
P0161 O2 Sensor 2/2 Heater Performance
P0171 Fuel System 1/1 Lean
P0172 Fuel System 1/1 Rich
P0174 Fuel System 2/1 Lean
P0175 Fuel System 2/1 Rich
P0201 Fuel Injector 1 Circuit
P0202 Fuel Injector 2 Circuit
P0203 Fuel Injector 3 Circuit
P0204 Fuel Injector 4 Circuit
P0205 Fuel Injector 5 Circuit
P0206 Fuel Injector 6 Circuit
P0218 High Temperature Operation Activated
P0221 Throttle Position Sensor 2 Performance
P0222 Throttle Position Sensor 2 Circuit Low
P0223 Throttle Position Sensor 2 Circuit High
P0300 Multiple Cylinder Misfire
P0301 Cylinder 1 Misfire
P0302 Cylinder 2 Misfire
P0303 Cylinder 3 Misfire
P0304 Cylinder 4 Misfire
P0305 Cylinder 5 Misfire
P0306 Cylinder 6 Misfire
P0315 No Crank Sensor Learned
P0325 Knock Sensor 1 Circuit
P0335 Crankshaft Position Sensor Circuit
P0339 Crankshaft Position Sensor Intermittent
P0340 Camshaft Position Sensor Circuit
P0344 Camshaft Position Sensor Intermittent
P0349 Camshaft Position Sensor “A” Circuit Intermittent Bank 2
P0401 Egr System Performance
P0403 Egr Solenoid Circuit
P0404 Egr Position Sensor Rationality Open
P0405 Egr Position Sensor Circuit Low
P0406 Egr Position Sensor Circuit High
P0420 Catalyst Efficiency (bank 1)
P0430 Catalyst Efficiency (bank 2)
P0440 General Evap System Failure
P0441 Evap Purge System Performance
P0443 Evap Purge Solenoid Circuit
P0452 Evap Pressure Switch Stuck Closed
P0455 Evap Purge System Large Leak
P0456 Evap Purge System Small Leak
P0457 Loose Fuel Cap
P0461 Fuel Level Sensor 1 Performance
P0462 Fuel Level Sensor 1 Circuit Low
P0463 Fuel Level Sensor 1 Circuit High
P0480 Cooling Fan 1 Control Circuit
P0481 Cooling Fan 2 Control Circuit
P0501 Vehicle Speed Sensor 1 Performance
P0503 Vehicle Speed Sensor 1 Erratic
P0506 Idle Speed Performance Lower Than Expected
P0507 Idle Speed Performance Higher Than Expected
P050b Cold Start Ignition Timing Performance
P050d Cold Start Rough Idle
P0513 Invalid Skim Key
P0522 Engine Oil Pressure Too Low
P0532 A/c Pressure Sensor Circuit Low
P0533 A/c Pressure Sensor Circuit High
P0562 Battery Voltage Low
P0562 Battery Voltage Low
P0563 Battery Voltage High
P0571 Brake Switch 1 Performance
P0572 Brake Switch 1 Stuck On
P0573 Brake Switch 1 Stuck Off
P0579 Speed Control Switch 1 Performance
P0580 Speed Control Switch 1 Circuit Low
P0581 Speed Control Switch 1 Circuit High
P0585 Speed Control Switch 1/2 Correlation
P0591 Speed Control Switch 2 Performance
P0592 Speed Control Switch 2 Circuit Low
P0593 Speed Control Switch 2 Circuit High
P0600 Serial Communication Link
P0601 Internal Memory Checksum Invalid
P0602 Control Module Programming Error/not Programmed
P0602 Control Module Programming Error/not Programmed
P0604 Internal Control Module Ram
P0605 Internal Control Module Rom
P0606 Internal Ecm Processor
P060b Etc A/d Ground Performance
P060d Etc Level 2 App Performance
P060e Etc Level 2 Tps Performance
P060f Etc Level 2 Ect Performance
P0613 Internal Transmission Processor
P061a Etc Level 2 Torque Performance
P061c Etc Level 2 Rpm Performance
P0622 Generator Field Control Circuit
P0627 Fuel Pump Control Circuit
P062c Etc Level 2 Mph Performance
P0630 Vin Not Programmed In Pcm
P0632 Odometer Not Programmed In Pcm
P0633 Skim Secret Key Not Stored In Pcm
P063a Generator Voltage Sense Circuit
P0642 Sensor Reference Voltage 1 Circuit Low
P0643 Sensor Reference Voltage 1 Circuit High
P0645 A/c Clutch Control Circuit
P0652 Sensor Reference Voltage 2 Circuit Low
P0653 Sensor Reference Voltage 2 Circuit High
P0685 Auto Shutdown Control Circuit
P0688 Auto Shutdown Sense Circuit Low
P0691 Cooling Fan 1 Control Circuit Low
P0692 Cooling Fan 1 Control Circuit High
P0693 Cooling Fan 2 Control Circuit Low
P0694 Cooling Fan 2 Control Circuit High
P0700 Transmission Control System (mil Request)
P0703 Brake Switch 2 Performance
P0706 Transmission Range Sensor Rationality
P0711 Transmission Temperature Sensor Performance
P0712 Transmission Temperature Sensor Low
P0713 Transmission Temperature Sensor High
P0714 Transmission Temperature Sensor Intermittent
P0716 Input Speed Sensor 1 Circuit Performance
P0721 Output Speed Sensor Circuit Performance
P0726 Engine Speed Input Circuit Range/performance
P0731 Gear Ratio Error In 1st
P0732 Gear Ratio Error In 2nd
P0733 Gear Ratio Error In 3rd
P0734 Gear Ratio Error In 4th
P0736 Gear Ratio Error In Reverse
P0740 Tcc Out Of Range
P0750 Lr Solenoid Circuit
P0755 2/4 Solenoid Circuit
P0760 Od Solenoid Circuit
P0765 Ud Solenoid Circuit
P0841 Lr Pressure Switch Rationality
P0845 2/4 Hydraulic Pressure Test
P0846 2/4 Pressure Switch Rationality
P0850 Park/neutral Switch Performance
P0853 Overdrive/tow Switch Input Circuit Stuck
P0868 Line Pressure Low
P0869 Line Pressure High
P0870 Od Hydraulic Pressure Test
P0871 Od Pressure Switch Rationality
P0882 Tcm Power Input Low
P0883 Tcm Power Input High
P0884 Power Up At Speed
P0888 Transmission Relay Always Off
P0890 Switched Battery
P0891 Transmission Relay Always On
P0897 Transmission Fluid Deteriorated
P0933 Line Pressure Sensor Circuit Performance
P0934 Line Pressure Sensor Circuit Low
P0935 Line Pressure Sensor Circuit High
P0944 Loss Of Hydraulic Pump Prime
P0992 2/4/od Hydraulic Pressure Test
P1115 General Temperature Rationality
P1128 Closed Loop Fueling Not Achieved (Bank 1)
P1129 Closed Loop Fueling Not Achieved (Bank 2)
P1273 A/c Clutch Control Circuit 2 High (tipm)
P1275 A/c Clutch Control Circuit 2 Overcurrent (tipm)
P128b Tcm Power Control Circuit 2 Low (Tipm)
P128c Tcm Power Control Circuit 2 High (Tipm)
P128d Tcm Power Control Circuit 2 Open (Tipm)
P128e Tcm Power Control Circuit 2 Overcurrent (Tipm)
P129c Inverter Control Circuit High (tipm)
P129e Inverter Control Circuit Overcurrent (tipm)
P1404 Egr Position Sensor Rationality Closed
P1501 Vehicle Speed Sensor 1/2 Correlation (Drive Wheels)
P1502 Vehicle Speed Sensor 1/2 Correlation (Non Drive Wheels)
P1572 Brake Pedal Stuck On
P1573 Brake Pedal Stuck Off
P1593 Speed Control Switch 1/2 Stuck
P1602 Pcm Not Programmed
P1607 Pcm Internal Shutdown Timer Rationality Too Slow
P1618 Sensor Reference Voltage 1 Circuit Erratic
P1628 Sensor Reference Voltage 2 Circuit Erratic
P1684 Battery Was Disconnected
P1696 Eeprom Memory Write Denied/invalid
P1697 Emr (sri) Mileage Not Stored
P1713 Restricted Manual Valve In T2 Range
P1745 Transmission Line Pressure Too High For Too Long
P1775 Solenoid Switch Valve Latched In Tcc Position
P1776 Solenoid Switch Valve Latched In Lr Position
P1790 Fault Immediately After Shift
P1794 Speed Sensor Ground Error
P1797 Manual Shift Overheat
P1897 Level 1 Rpm Bus Unlock
P2072 Electronic Throttle Control System (Ice Blockage)
P2096 Downstream Fuel Trim System 1 Lean
P2097 Downstream Fuel Trim System 1 Rich
P2098 Downstream Fuel Trim System 2 Lean
P2099 Downstream Fuel Trim System 2 Rich
P2100 Electronic Throttle Control Motor Circuit
P2101 Electronic Throttle Control Motor Performance
P2107 Electronic Throttle Control Module Processor
P2110 Electronic Throttle Control (Forced Limited Rpm)
P2111 Electronic Throttle Control (Unable To Close)
P2112 Electronic Throttle Control (Unable To Open)
P2115 Accelerator Pedal Position Sensor 1 Minimum Stop Performance
P2116 Accelerator Pedal Position Sensor 2 Minimum Stop Performance
P2118 Electronic Throttle Control Motor Current Performance
P2122 Accelerator Pedal Position Sensor 1 Circuit Low
P2123 Accelerator Pedal Position Sensor 1 Circuit High
P2127 Accelerator Pedal Position Sensor 2 Circuit Low
P2128 Accelerator Pedal Position Sensor 2 Circuit High
P2135 Throttle Position Sensor 1/2 Correlation
P2138 Accelerator Pedal Position Sensor 1/2 Correlation
P2161 Vehicle Speed Sensor 2 Erratic
P2166 Accelerator Pedal Position Sensor 1 Maximum Stop Performance
P2167 Accelerator Pedal Position Sensor 2 Maximum Stop Performance
P2172 High Airflow / Vacuum Leak Detected (instantaneous Accumulation)
P2173 High Airflow / Vacuum Leak Detected (slow Accumulation)
P2174 Low Airflow / Restriction Detected (instantaneous Accumulation)
P2175 Low Airflow / Restriction Detected (slow Accumulation)
P2181 Cooling System Performance
P2271 O2 Sensor 1/2 Signal Stuck Rich
P2273 O2 Sensor 2/2 Signal Stuck Rich
P2299 Brake Pedal Position / Accelerator Pedal Position Incompatible
P2302 Ignition Coil 1 Secondary Circuit- Insufficient Ionization
P2305 Ignition Coil 2 Secondary Circuit- Insufficient Ionization
P2308 Ignition Coil 3 Secondary Circuit- Insufficient Ionization
P2503 Charging System Output Low
P2504 Charging System Output High
P2610 Pcm Internal Shutdown Timer Rationality Too Fast


Network

U0001 Can C Bus
U0001 Can C Bus
U0001 Can C Bus Circuit
U0002 Can C Bus Off Performance
U0010 Can Interior Bus
U0010 Can Interior Bus
U0011 Can Interior Bus Off Performance
U0019 Can Interior Bus(+)/(-) Circuit
U0020 Can Interior Bus Off Performance
U0100 Lost Communication With Ecm/pcm
U0100 Lost Communication With Ecm/pcm
U0100 Lost Communication With Ecm/pcm
U0100 Lost Communication With Ecm/pcm
U0101 Lost Communication With Tcm
U0101 Lost Communication With Tcm
U0101 Lost Communication With Tcm
U0114 Lost Communication With Final Drive Control Module
U0114 Lost Communication With Final Drive Control Module
U0121 Lost Communication With Abs
U0121 Lost Communication With Anti-lock Brake Module
U0121 Lost Communication With Anti-lock Brake System (abs) Control Module
U0121 Lost Communication With Anti-lock Brake Module
U0121 Lost Communication With Anti-lock Brake Module
U0121 Lost Communication With Anti-lock Brake Module
U0126 Lost Communication With Sas Can C (steering Angle Sensor)
U0141 Lost Communication With Fcm
U0141 Lost Communication With Front Control Module (tipm)
U0141 Lost Communication With Front Control Module
U0141 Lost Communication With Front Control Module
U0141 Lost Communication With Front Control Module (tipm)
U0141 Lost Communication With Front Control Module (tipm)
U0141 Lost Communication With Front Control Module
U0146 Lost Communication With Central Gateway
U0151 Lost Communication With Occupant Restraint Controller (orc)
U0151 Lost Communication With Occupant Restraint Controller
U0151 Lost Communication With Occupant Restraint Controller (orc)
U0151 Lost Communication With Occupant Restraint Controller
U0154 Lost Communication With Occupant Classification Module
U0154 Lost Communication With Occupant Classification Module
U0154 Lost Communication With Occupant Classification Module
U0154 Lost Communication With Occupant Classification Module
U0155 Lost Communication With Cluster/ccn
U0155 Lost Communication With Cluster/ccn (skreem)
U0155 Lost Communication With Cluster/ccn
U0155 Lost Communication With Cluster/ccn
U0155 Lost Communication With Cluster/ccn
U0161 Lost Communication With Compass Module
U0164 Lost Communication With Hvac Control Module
U0164 Lost Communication With Hvac Control Module
U0167 Lost Communication With Intrusion Transceiver Control Module
U0167 Lost Communication With Intrusion Transceiver Control Module
U0168 Lost Communication With Vehicle Security Control Module (skreem-wcm)
U0168 Lost Communication With Vehicle Security Control Module (skreem/wcm)
U0168 Lost Communication With Vehicle Security Control Module (skreem/wcm)
U0168 Lost Communication With Vehicle Security Control Module (skreem/wcm)
U0170 Lost Communication W/up-front Left Satellite Acceleration Sensor
U0171 Lost Communication W/up-front Right Satellite Acceleration Sensor
U0172 Lost Communication W/left Side Satellite Acceleration Sensor 1
U0175 Communication W/right Side Satellite Acceleration Sensor 1
U0184 Lost Communication With Radio
U0184 Lost Communication With Radio
U0184 Lost Communication With Radio
U0184 Lost Communication With Radio
U0184 Lost Communication With Radio
U0186 Lost Communication With Audio Amplifier
U0186 Lost Communication With Audio Amplifier
U0186 Lost Communication With Audio Amplifier
U0186 Lost Communication With Audio Amplifier
U0193 Lost Communication With Traffic Information Receiver Module
U0195 Lost Communication With Sdars
U0195 Lost Communication With Sdar
U0197 Lost Communication With Hands Free Phone Module
U0197 Lost Communication With Hands Free Module
U0199 Lost Communication With Drivers Door Module
U0200 Lost Communication With Passenger Door Module
U0415 Implausible Data Received From Abs
U0447 Implausible Data Received From Central
U1008 Lin 1 Bus
U1008 Lin 1 Bus
U110a Lost Communication With Scm
U110c Lost Fuel Level Message
U110d Lost Communication With Security Siren
U110e Lost Ambient Temperature Message
U110f Lost Fuel Volume Message
U1110 Lost Vehicle Speed Message
U1113 Lost A/c Pressure Message
U1120 Lost Wheel Distance Message
U113b Lost Communication With Switch Bank Module
U1149 Lost Communication With Multifunction
U1159 Lost Communication With Asbs
U1169 Lost Communication With Intrusion Sensor 1
U1170 Lost Communication With Intrusion Sensor 2
U1179 Lost Communication With Intrusion Sensor 3
U1403 Implausible Fuel Level Signal Received
U1411 Implausible Fuel Volume Signal Received
U1412 Implausible Vehicle Speed Signal Received
U1414 Implausible/missing Ecu Network Configuration Data
U1415 Implausible/missing Vehicle Configuration Data
U1416 Implausible Security Siren Signal Received
U1417 Implausible Left Wheel Distance Signal Received
U1418 Implausible Right Wheel Distance Signal
U1419 Implausible Data Received From Ocs Sensor 3 (Left Front)
U141a Implausible Data Received From Ocs Sensor 2 (Right Front)
U141b Implausible Data Received From Ocs Sensor 4 (Left Rear)
U141c Implausible Data Received From Ocs Sensor 1 (Right Rear)